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childhood obesity

Fighting Childhood Obesity—Session 3

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Fighting Childhood Obesity—Session 3

SuperMommyNot.com is producing a year long series in which we will focus on the issue of childhood obesity. Dr. Stacy Wadlington, a licensed clinical psychologist, will be guiding a mother and her daughter through therapy in an effort to help them make healthier choices. We have been invited to sit in on their therapy sessions and learn from the work this family is committed to.

In session three, Felicia (the mother) and Simone (the daughter) sit down with Dr. Wadlington to discuss how a lack of discipline in everyday life was detrimental to Simone’s well-being and feelings about food and nutrition.

Dr. Wadlington is in private practice in Beverly Hills and Pasadena California. She has worked extensively with children, adolescents and adults for over sixteen years providing clinical services in the form of individual, family, couple and group therapy. Dr. Wadlington’s assessment experience includes conducting psychological and forensic evaluations to a wide variety of patient populations, including candidates for Cosmetic and Bariatric Surgery. For more information about Dr. Wadlington you can visit her website. http://www.drwadlington.com/

Below is a look at Sessions 1 and 2

http://www.supermommynot.com/fighting-childhood-obesity-session-1

http://www.supermommynot.com/fighting-childhood-obesity-session-2

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Fighting Childhood Obesity — Session 2

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Fighting Childhood Obesity — Session 2

SuperMommyNot.com is producing a year long series in which we will focus on the issue of childhood obesity. Dr. Stacy Wadlington, a licensed clinical psychologist, will be guiding a mother and her daughter through therapy in an effort to help them make healthier choices. We have been invited to sit in on their therapy sessions and learn from the work this family is committed to.

In session two, Felicia (the mother) and Simone (the daughter) sit down with Dr. Wadlington to discuss how Felicia’s parenting may have negatively impacted the way Simone viewed/views herself.

Dr. Wadlington is in private practice in Beverly Hills and Pasadena California. She has worked extensively with children, adolescents and adults for over sixteen years providing clinical services in the form of individual, family, couple and group therapy. Dr. Wadlington’s assessment experience includes conducting psychological and forensic evaluations to a wide variety of patient populations, including candidates for Cosmetic and Bariatric Surgery. For more information about Dr. Wadlington you can visit her website. http://www.drwadlington.com/

Below is a look at Session 1-

http://www.supermommynot.com/fighting-childhood-obesity-session-1

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Fighting Childhood Obesity—Session 1

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Fighting Childhood Obesity—Session 1

SuperMommyNot.com is producing a year long series in which we will focus on the issue of childhood obesity. Dr. Stacy Wadlington, a licensed clinical psychologist, will be guiding a mother and her daughter through therapy in an effort to help them make healthier choices. We have been invited to sit in on their therapy sessions and learn from the work this family is committed to.

Dr. Wadlington is in private practice in Beverly Hills and Pasadena California. She has worked extensively with children, adolescents and adults for over sixteen years providing clinical services in the form of individual, family, couple and group therapy. Dr. Wadlington’s assessment experience includes conducting psychological and forensic evaluations to a wide variety of patient populations, including candidates for Cosmetic and Bariatric Surgery. For more information about Dr. Wadlington you can visit her website. http://www.drwadlington.com/index.html

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The Real Sugar Story

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The Real Sugar Story

Did you know that the average American consumes 88 grams of added sugar a day? That is as much as two to seven times more than we should consume in a given day.

It’s important to distinguish between added sugar and naturally occurring sugars. Fruits, some vegetables and dairy products already have sugar which we call “naturally occurring sugars” and it’s safe to say that everything else (soda, candy, cereal, etc.) has sugar that has been “added.” There are even some foods with “hidden sugar.”

According to the American Heart Association, children should only have 12 grams of added sugar a day, adult women 24 grams and adult men should have no more than 36 grams of added sugar in an entire day.

So where does this leave us? And where does this leave our children? Unfortunately, beginning with breakfast, the cereals in our markets are packed with more sugar than in one dessert. In some cases, some of the cereals have up to 20 grams of added sugar in one serving.

Reducing the amount of added sugar in your child’s diet is one of the quickest and simplest ways to improve overall health and well-being. Many people who reduce the amount of added sugar in their diets report improved moods, increased weight loss and less fatigue.

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